Posts Tagged: ‘reverse look up’

How Reverse Phone Look Up Works

May 7, 2019 Posted by Pamela M

Reverse Phone Lookup Apps

Phone apps and online phone books use reverse look ups to help you find the name and address of a person attached to a phone number. The phone number can be a landline or a cell phone number, although the latter is harder to search.

Reasons to Search

You might use a reverse phone search for several reasons:

The Caller ID on your phone shows several calls from Suzy Smith at 814-991-0451. Who is she, and where is the 814 area code from?

You see phone numbers on your bill that you don’t recognize. Did you make the calls or was it a mistake?

You find a sticky note on your desk with a phone number written on it. You have four choices: throw it away, save it until you remember, call and hope you recognize the voice, or use a reverse search. The latter is the easiest and probably the least embarrassing on the list.

You have a missed call from an unfamiliar number. Should you call the number back or ignore it as if it was a wrong number or telemarketer?

Your boss tells you to pick up a package at a local business, but you only have the phone number. You can use an iPhone app to find the owner of a phone number as well as the address.

How It Works

Reverse phone look up is easy to use. You can go online to a search engine and put the number, including the area code and country code, if applicable, in to the search box. The search engine uses its database to provide the user with many sites that say they know the owner and location of the number. You can also type “reverse look up” into a search engine box to find the top websites to run a search on. They should state if the search is free or if it requires a membership or fee. Sites offering cell phone or unlisted number information usually charge a fee.

Using dedicated websites is a more efficient way to search and will give better results. You can use the WhitePages.com database, which tracks about 80% of U.S. phone numbers. It also stores international phone numbers. In addition, you can use a phone app to search a number. Because they are widely used, phone apps tend to be updated the most.

Landline phone numbers give the best results. Before the Internet became popular, phone companies published phone books and reverse phone number directories for each town. The directories were available to police and other officials as well as libraries for public use.

Why It Isn’t Always Free

Websites must pay to maintain their databases. They also collect information from many sources such as phone books, websites, social media, and other directories. Cell phone numbers are difficult to get because there isn’t a phone directory for mobile phones. Even if there were a directory for cell phones, people change numbers so often that it would be almost impossible to keep the information up to date.

Don’t Be a Victim of a Disaster Scam

January 21, 2019 Posted by Pamela M

Scammers collect money for disaster victims.

 

Many parts of the country routinely face weather emergencies: power outages, loss of water, loss of homes, and much more. Unaffected people are asked to donate to help those in need. It’s a noble thing to do to help the less fortunate. Less noble is the fact that someone out there is waiting to take advantage of the situation. Scammers take to the phones to ask for donations, playing upon sympathy and human kindness. Some callers shame those who don’t donate. If you want to donate to help others, be sure that the organization making the request is legitimate.

Scammers are smart. They don’t invent charities. Many use well-established organizations to make the potential donor feel secure in laying out money.

The American Red Cross is the most well-known disaster agency in the world. Scammers have contacted donors by using a fake address – like @redcross.net or by phone. The Red Cross never asks for personal information and advises people to be cautious if they receive a phone call. If you want to donate, call the organization directly or go to a local office. Anyone who suspects a disaster-based scam should contact The National Center for Disaster Fraud at (866) 720-5721 or email the NCDF at [email protected].

Is it a phone scam?

Many people think that scammers are foreigners and that it’s easy to tell if a call is real. That’s not true. Scammers aren’t always located in foreign countries. The calls could come from someone in your neighborhood trying to make a quick buck. The scammers tend to be highly aggressive with their victims.

Legitimate charities do call people to get contributions. The best way to protect yourself is to research the organization before giving a donation. Scammers use fake phone numbers, so you can’t use an iPhone phone number tracker to find where the call originates. Take the following steps to avoid falling for a phone scam:

1.     Ask questions

Question the caller where the money goes. Ask the caller for the organization’s name and address. Scammers may not be able to answer and hang up.

2.     Ensure the charity is real

Don’t donate when someone calls. Charitable and non-profit organizations are required by law to be registered with the state. If the charity is real, you can call back or donate through their website. If you donate, get a receipt.

3.     Don’t give out personal information

Never give out personal information.

4.     Keep emotions in check

Scammers will play upon your emotions. They will tell sad stories about children, homeless people, or those with no water or electric; anything that will cause a reaction. They may use guilt tactics. Whenever a caller asks for a specific dollar amount, hang up.

5.     Report suspicious activity

If you think might be the target of a scam, call The Federal Trade Commission immediately.